Fruits of Our Labor

A haibun alluding to the solstice for DVerse’s Haibun Monday.


Sweet, ripe strawberries convey the taste of summer. Store-bought may be bigger, but nothing can beat the beauty of garden-grown. The sun from my own back yard reddens the fruits, which have grown from hand-planted seeds, just as this daylight has grown from the seeds of winter nights. Teeth sink gratefully into the fruits of our labor.

This moment stands still
Reaching the peak of ripeness —
Sweet strawberry juice

Noticing the Flourishing

May’s full moon is on Wednesday, and it is known as the Flower Moon, as Frank, the host of DVerse Haibun Monday, says.


This month, I have noticed a wealth of new flowers in the garden: varying shapes and shades, hues of pink and yellow, almost whatever one could name. Bees are busy pollinating, and the blueberries, too, are growing and ripening from a gentle light-green. We have already picked a bowlful; soon the fruits will fill baskets. The garden is waiting to give many other fruits and vegetables as treasures.

after heat of day
buzz of all activity
rests under the moon

 

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Hungry Birds

My family’s garden has been a frequent source of inspiration lately (and honestly almost every time I go out there), and it fit perfectly with PSU’s Weekly Scribblings prompt, “Bird is the Word.” I am also linking with DVerse OLN.


goldfinch and friends cheep
perch and search among the plants:
empty bird-feeder

 

Poor birds. 😦 I still saw plenty of them, though.

A Lesson

Today’s poem was actually inspired by yesterday’s one-word challenge from Fandango, which was “never.” I guess this also builds off of yesterday’s post, in which I mentioned that we could learn from those strawberry flowers. Here’s something else to learn from them.


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Growing Strawberries

I wrote this string of haiku after observing the strawberry plants in my family’s garden. We have many berries growing and a few flowers on the plants. 

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I wrote this poem, in a way, to the little flower and about them. The interesting thing about them is that, even though there are many fully-grown berries by them, they do not compare themselves, and they never think that they are growing too slowly, nor think of themselves as failures. There are lessons that flowers can teach us, I think. And by “us,” of course I mean “me.” 

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Holy Saturday: a Puente Poem

On this Holy Saturday, we read an excerpt from an ancient homily as a part of the Liturgy of the Hours. It inspired me because it is a fantastic example of antithesis. Click here to read it. The homily, plus some Bible verses, inspired this poem, which is called a Puente poem because the middle line acts as a “bridge” between the two stanzas.


Just as in Adam all die,
So in Christ shall all be made alive:
Adam’s side had brought forth Eve,
Christ’s side made blood and water stream

~ My side has healed the pain in yours ~

Human hearts experience much hurt,
But the Lord the last word does assert:
Angels which had blocked the garden
Guide souls to heaven, gracious pardon.

Haibun for the End of March

A haibun for DVerse, alluding to cherry blossoms, also partially inspired by FOWC: Slight, but mostly inspired by my family’s garden.


A warm afternoon at the end of March passes both languidly and much too quickly. The sky is blue, with no clouds blowing in the slight breeze. A monarch butterfly, black-and-orange wings majestic and beautiful flies — almost floats — nearly close enough to kiss the nose of an observer. The bird-feeders, filled for the first time in a long while, attract many other winged creatures, feathered things opening their hungry beaks.

And it is around now, when the cherry blossoms bloom at their peak.

Nature takes her time —
From the outside see Earth spin
Making us dizzy