That Dramatic Irony Though

Another repost for Fandango’s Flashback Friday, just like last week. On January 13, 2020, I posted this poem, titled “The Twenties. Linked with JusJoJan day 14.


The Twenties

This decade we return to
The roaring twenties —
Back then there were plenty
Of threats, just no one knew
About them yet.

I wonder if these twenties
Will be roaring —
When it seems more likely
That I, for one, might be
Cowering and whimpering.


“Might be” — yeah, just maybe… *RW laughs until she cries*

brown framed eyeglasses on a calendar
Photo by Olya Kobruseva on Pexels.com

Would You?

A cherita inspired by MVB: Girl. I’m actually not this depressed right now, so I’m not sure where this is coming from. The picture of the cute little fawn is because looking for an illustration for this post was pretty dark, but the fawn showed up for some reason. Voilà, incongruity!


If you knew the entirety of a life,

As this infant grew into a girl,
Then an adolescent, then a woman

And you knew everything that would happen,
Including how and when she would end,
I wonder if you’d celebrate her birthday?

baby roe deer standing and looking
Photo by Amber Kipp on Pexels.com

In the back of my mind…

In the beginning of our stream-of-consciousness Saturday post, we must have the words “In the…” What comes after that? I’m not sure. It’s past dinnertime, and I still haven’t written any poems at all today. Well, 2 lines of an acrostic, and 1.5 lines of another poem (not sure what form it will be).

In the back of my mind,
There is probably something
I still have left to say —
Something which one day
Was buried, yet buried alive.
Maybe that’s why
Anxiety won’t quite leave me,
Why it lives in my body —
It has more to say.

I was hoping to not write about anxiety / problems, but that’s what came out. At least I have actually written a whole poem today, finally.

So?

Flashback Friday.


I wasn’t going to post anything today, but Linda’s challenge tells us to “Just Jot It,” JusJoJan 7, so here is something. I wrote this exactly 3 years ago:

Memento —
Memento mori
Moribund flowers wilt into winter,
Winter sun sleeps early,
Earlier than you think will the grim reaper come,
Come to claim your life, so —

So how are you going to live?

On Epiphany

Today is the traditional Feast of the Epiphany, when the Wise Men arrived to see and worship the baby Jesus. I wrote this Chaucerian stanza on Sunday, when the Epiphany was observed at Mass. The Magi certainly had a sense of anticipation as the journeyed such a long distance to find Jesus, and they were privileged to witness the unfathomable mystery of God becoming a human baby. 


person holding a star shaped neon light
Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

Astronomers who’d journeyed from afar
Rejoiced to lay their treasures at His feet,
Trusting there was a Light beyond their star:
True King and God, whom death could not defeat.
In Mary’s arms the Savior they did greet,
Their Lord, their great reward at journey’s end.
Now to all people Christ’s life still extends.

Linked with DVerse OLN.

No Wonder They Had Us Color So Much in Therapy

As juvenile as it is, I do enjoy coloring. We did it a lot in “art therapy,” so I learned to like it, and thanks to the generosity of a very good friend, I have a huge book of pictures with Bible verses (I have posted some finished pictures on here before). The activity is relaxing in itself, and the book reminds me that I have friend(s). Overall, it gives me a positive feeling, like a warm, hand-knit scarf. As the poem explains, some of its “lessons” are surprisingly applicable to life in general, so it gives me some hope, too.


Beginning with very little planning,
No way to un-color what has been done,
Perhaps it quickly looks different
From the vision when it was begun. Continue reading

The Crib and the Cross

The first thing I think of when I look at the word “Memento” is always, “Memento Mori” — “Remember you will die.” Isn’t that such a fun thing to think about on Christmas? Thinking more about it, however, I realized it’s more appropriate than one might realize: Yes, today is a joyous day when Jesus was born, but He came into the world to save humanity, because everyone was lost without Him. He came into the world, ultimately, to die in a horrible way and then to conquer death by rising again.

As a newborn child, Jesus was placed in a manger — a place where animals ate from. This foreshadowed Him becoming the Bread of Life and giving us Himself.

I’m not a theologian, but that’s just what I’m thinking of, reflecting on Jesus’s birth and the fact that, because He is God, he knew the reason for which He came, even from the first instant. Even His birth foreshadows His death. Thankfully, “Memento Mori” does not have to be too dark of a phrase because death is not the end; death is only a new beginning.

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This is a photo that I took this morning before Mass. I was struck by the fact that, among all the Christmas trees and happy decorations, Jesus was on the crucifix. Interesting juxtaposition, yet very appropriate.

Merry Christmas to everyone, even if you’re not Christian! Happy day! 😀

The Places We Have Passed

For FOWC: Spot and MVB: Road. I am also linking to the Friday Writings (on a Sunday). The prompt is optional, yet this happens to relate tangentially because of the pain of loss. This poem was written while thinking of those people who affected my life in a hugely positive way, yet who are no longer a large part of my life. It’s horribly painful when friends grow apart, even if there’s not a particular reason for it, other than lives diverging. Anyway, without further ado… Continue reading