Ribs

When your dinner inspires a poem, you might have a problem. 🙂 However, it’s the kind of problem that I love to have. In April I have set the goal to post a poem every day, so this is the one I’ve chosen to share today.


Very messy,
Like the ribs that I’ve been eating —
Very messy
Side of life that others don’t see,
Façade behind which heart’s beating —
Recall, my dear, all hide something
Very messy.

Celebration

Inspired by Easter Sunday, this is for the décima challenge and for MLMM’s Saturday Mix: Double Take.


Humans did err, got caught in claws
Of death, yet Jesus came, erased
The penalty — He, our faith’s base,
This is our celebration’s cause.

This deserves more than loud applause
But a whole life: God made us heirs
With Christ, all His blessings He shares.
Bass, tenor, alto, soprano
All sing in harmony and show
Even death itself — life which dares.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

California Calamity

Today’s SoCS prompt is “starts with cal,” and the first thing I thought of is calories, but we’re not going to write a post about that. 🙂 Hmm… Calzone (yummy!). Oh, yeah, California, calling… But California doesn’t need to call because I am already here.  I hope we don’t experience any calamities anytime soon. I’m pretty scared of earthquakes.


shaking California ground
comes upon us sans one sound
the thing that causes much fear,
potentially always here —
nothing like the “quake” started
last March, in the year departed,
life can change quickly, warning
not possible, lingering sting

If There’s a Reason….

For this week’s Weekly Scribblings at PSU, Rommy prompts us with several lines from the musical “Hamilton.” This brings back a lot of memories because I was really into the musical when it first came out, and certain lines from it really inspired and motivated me at the time. This is not a poem today. This is prose, and this is nonfiction.


“Dying is easy, young man. Living is harder.” That line could be the summary of my life.

Except, dying wasn’t all that easy, either.

With depression as persistent as it is, and the eating disorder which covered it being so dangerously severe, I’m amazed that I did not die. Soon after the musical “Hamilton” came out and my friend introduced me to its songs, I was in an intensive therapy program (again) to help with the eating disorder behaviors and consequences (again). I had heard that anorexia has one of the highest mortality rates of any mental illness, with up to 25% of sufferers dying, especially if they do not receive treatment. Thinking about all of the people I had met during my recovery journey — it was at least 4 dozen. Take 25% of that; that’s how many could have died already, when I was given a second chance and a third chance. Sometimes, I didn’t even want those extra chances, so why did they not go to somebody else?

I had asked myself — still do, in fact — why I got treatment, why I’m still alive at all. Even during that stint in the therapy program, I was inspired by another line from “Hamilton”: “If there’s a reason I’m still alive when so many have died, then I’m willing to wait for it.” Two years later, I revisited my journal from that time, and I was still waiting yet also re-inspired. If I ever find out the reason why God saved me, I am still willing to wait for it.

Ash Wednesday

For Frank’s current haikai challenge, I wrote a haibun about Ash Wednesday.

The ashes that are used to mark the foreheads of the faithful, as a sign of repentance, grief yet hope, are the ashes from the burnt palm branches from the previous year’s Palm Sunday. Since Palm Sunday was cancelled for the public last Lent, I wonder which branches were burned. They were burned along with the hope of certain earthly pleasures — a reminder that this was never meant to be anyone’s true home.

Symbol-filled ashes:
Journey to destination
Because life is Lent

Me, on Ash Wednesday 2017