Time / Eternity

For FOWC: Transitory. Shared with the Writers’ Pantry at PSU. Today, we Catholics celebrate Trinity Sunday, so I have been thinking a lot about the transitory nature of time and of this life, as compared with the permanence of eternity. One of the 6 or so poems that I wrote is a Diamante.

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We Waltz by Faith

For DVerse “Meeting the Bar,” we are waltzing with our words. I’m a little late to the (dance) party. 🙂


We walk by faith not sight,
Yet faith’s more than a guess:
The Holy Trinity
Becomes soul’s welcome guest —
He teaches how to live
And how to, trusting, rest.

The life of faith is hard,
Yet also it’s a dance:
A deep relationship
To daily life enhance —
Eternally enjoy
Exploring this romance.

Beloved

For the current Weekly Scribblings at PSU, Rosemary invites us to write about non-human beloved companions, whether they be pets or animals or even inanimate objects. I decided to write about my rosary. I carry one just about everywhere I go. It is more than an object because, through the prayers, it connects me to heaven. 🙂 Below is a picture of my favorite rosary.

My current favorite rosary

hear my prayer:
heart freely chooses
to stay close
to the source
of every loveliness,
the pearl of great price

Holy Saturday: a Puente Poem

On this Holy Saturday, we read an excerpt from an ancient homily as a part of the Liturgy of the Hours. It inspired me because it is a fantastic example of antithesis. Click here to read it. The homily, plus some Bible verses, inspired this poem, which is called a Puente poem because the middle line acts as a “bridge” between the two stanzas.


Just as in Adam all die,
So in Christ shall all be made alive:
Adam’s side had brought forth Eve,
Christ’s side made blood and water stream

~ My side has healed the pain in yours ~

Human hearts experience much hurt,
But the Lord the last word does assert:
Angels which had blocked the garden
Guide souls to heaven, gracious pardon.

Mary’s “Yes”

This décima is for the current challenge from Ronovan Writes. The word “dance” needs to end one of the D lines. This was completely different from my first attempt (which will not be posted 🙂 ), but I am pretty happy with this. I really admire Mary, the mother of Jesus!


After Mary’s “Yes” awaiting
On which humanity’s fate rests,
Relieved, angels have no regrets:
Cherubim and seraphim sing.

Mary’s “Fiat” an offering
Always humble under God’s will,
Immaculate Heart Spirit-filled.
Courageously she joins the dance,
Conscious of the divine romance,
And she loves her decision still.

Ronovan Writes Decima Challenge Image

March

Linda G. Hill’s SoCS prompt today is “day/week/month/year,” and she also invites us to write about our past year, SoCS-style or not, due to the one-year anniversary of this pandemic being declared. Regular readers of my blog probably already know how this pandemic (and especially the government’s response to it) has affected me. How to describe this past year, besides “crazy” and “surreal?” It was and still is especially hard for me because March 14 and 17 have been significant anniversaries in my life for years, and so all of that together is… :/ However, I acknowledge certain amazing things, particularly an online prayer community, which would not have happened without this pandemic and the lockdowns! Continue reading

Ash Wednesday

For Frank’s current haikai challenge, I wrote a haibun about Ash Wednesday.

The ashes that are used to mark the foreheads of the faithful, as a sign of repentance, grief yet hope, are the ashes from the burnt palm branches from the previous year’s Palm Sunday. Since Palm Sunday was cancelled for the public last Lent, I wonder which branches were burned. They were burned along with the hope of certain earthly pleasures — a reminder that this was never meant to be anyone’s true home.

Symbol-filled ashes:
Journey to destination
Because life is Lent

Me, on Ash Wednesday 2017

A Difficult Decision

Draw a simple chart:
Pros in one column
Cons in the opposite,
Worlds apart,
Yet warring in the brain.

The pros are numerous:
Rising like tiny
Bubbles in a glass
Of champagne —
Real pain
Of the cons carries
So
Much
Weight.


Today I’m loving my rosary and the online group I pray with. That has nothing to do with the poem, but it is what stopped me from going to bed at 3 in the afternoon — that’s what time we pray in the group.

Not my photo nor my rosary, but it looks cool.

person holding a rosary
Photo by Daniel Reche on Pexels.com

Sonnet: Dove of Peace

In this post from last week, I shared a picture and 2 poems inspired by it, wondering if I would start a series by reusing some of the lines to write different forms of poetry. Well, here is the next installment of the series: a Shakespearean sonnet (hoping to try a Petrarchian sonnet soon)! Shared with the Writers’ Pantry at Poets and Storytellers United.


The dove of peace brings healing in its wings,
The shining sun comes not so far behind –
A confluence of pinkish hues it beings,
The easier some happiness to find.
The dove of peace reveals itself to men
Although it often seems to’ve been delayed:
It can be shy, and finds its welcome when
True prayers of trust, like little stars arrayed,
Light up the people’s dark thoughts’ sky. Those stars
Provide much comfort when they’re born and rise,
Against despair and woeful words which mar –
With peace past understanding as the prize.
Thenceforth can many faith-filled flowers grow,
No matter which direction the winds blow.

Coloring 1_11