Multiple Medals

When I saw the MVB prompt, Pendant, I immediately thought of the necklace that I wear every day, which is silver and has (currently) four Catholic medals on it. Now I’ve got the poem written, so voilà. 


On a chain:

Silver Saint Thérèse,

Jesus King of Love,

And two Miraculous Medals —

Must need twice as many

Miracles, a shower of roses

You are good, Jesus

My soul knows this —

But don’t

Leave me

Hanging

RoCS

For today’s SoCS, “-roc-“ the first thing I thought about was “rock” (rather straightforwardly), and I also think about St. Roch. He is the patron saint of plague victims, I think, so last year, because of Covid, he was a popular saint. *laughs*

There once was a green crocodile,
Who left his clothes all in a pile:
When he needed to find
An outfit well-designed,
It took him a very long while!

Limericks work pretty well for the stream-of-consciousness format because they can be nonsensical and ridiculous!

The First Day of May

This short poem is for today’s SOCS: May. I’m not 100% happy with it, but because it’s stream-of-consciousness, I wasn’t allowed to think too much about the poem while I was writing it. XD I also began to write a poem for today’s FOWC, but since I’m not sure if I will finish it…. I stuck the word in my pre-poem ramblings. 🙂


Mary’s month is all of May,
Joseph the Worker is today:
Let us know our dignity,
As we celebrate and pray.

May we make humanity
Treat each other lovingly,
This holy couple as our guide,
Inherent worth let us see.

Google Doodle celebrates Labour Day | Samaja Live English

When Letters Come Together

Today’s official NaPoWriMo prompt is to write a poem inspired by the meaning of your name. I always thought I knew what Jenna meant (little bird), but apparently, there are more meanings. I suppose that’s a lot like my personality because I am always trying to find more meaning, delving deeper into the “why”s of existence and the intricacies of the events that happen or don’t happen… I’m rambling a bit. Another meaning, apparently, comes from Arabic, and it means “heaven.” That’s very flattering! XD It is also a variant of Jean, which means “God’s grace.” No wonder I like St. Jeanne d’Arc.

By Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres cartelfr.louvre.fr, Public Domain

Just a simple little bird
Extends to much more, by God’s grace:
Now I find more pieces,
Nuances on the map to Heaven,
Acting as refreshment for the warrior

I was going to write something fancy, but here is an acrostic for today.

Remembering Easter

Today’s MTB at DVerse is about haiku sequences. I know haiku are usually about nature, but my sequence is about St. Mary Magdalene, whose feast day was a few days ago, on July 22.


The sun was rising
When Mary Magdalene came
To visit the tomb.

The sun was rising
To start a mournful morning:
Was the Lord stolen?

Mary Magdalene
Stayed and waited when she came,
‘Til Jesus found her.

To visit the tomb
Then able to tell good news –
The Belovèd lives!

And Dust Will Rest

This is what happens when I attempt to clean. I get distracted by partially-formed, existential poems that need to be written! *laughs*

Update: linking to DVerse open-link because I actually really like this one and hope that more people see it!


And dust will rest on everything:
Dust will rest on once-pristine
Photo frames, and images of saints.
Dust will rest in the corners, by the
Floorboards, and on high shelves.
Dust will comfort the furniture,
As if it needs dust’s thick gray
Blanket when it is so neglected.

And dust will rest on everything:
Dust will rest on what I just
Dusted yesterday, thickening layers.
Dust will rest on my matryoshka
Dolls and the lucky manekineko cat.
Dust will read the many books
That I have stacked high, and one day
Cover every journal that I write.

Looking at Psalm 131

Please read psalm 131 here. It inspired this shadorma in an indirect way. This poem, written after a conversation with a friend which helped to calm my anxiety, is shared with DVerse OLN.


Remember:
Song of quiet trust,
Dig in deep
Stand your ground
Until reinforcements come —
Angels will arrive.

An Abyss of Blessings

Today’s poem is inspired by the fact that, in the Catholic Church, today is the memorial of Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque. She lived from 1647 to 1690. I read this quotation from one of her letters this morning:

“This divine heart [of Christ] is an abyss of all blessings, and into it the poor should submerge all their needs. It is an abyss of joy in which all of us can immerse our sorrows. It is an abyss of lowliness to counteract our foolishness, an abyss of mercy for the wretched, an abyss of love to meet our every need.”

The quotation led to this poem.

“Abyss” is an unusual word
To use referring to what’s good;
Yet in this paradox is heard
A depth of wisdom. Ask this: “Could
The Lord allow something that seems
To be unloving to our eyes?”
Yes, out of darkness God redeems
The suffering, and can surprise
Our own hearts with what He creates.
So out of the abyss can soar
More happiness. The one who waits
With hope will see such joys outpour.

 

Note: Shared with Angie Trafford’s Writing Wednesday because I mentioned darkness. Also shared with DVerse OLN.